This is a picture of ESMT books and working papers

Publications

ESMT Berlin publishes in international academic journals, which are first-class in their respective fields. Research also provides cutting-edge and profound insights for the business community as well as the classroom through managerial publications and case studies. This rare integration of research and practice makes ESMT Berlin an outstanding location for generating relevant and ground-breaking knowledge.

Journal Article

So Lernen Sie, Daten zu Lieben [Why IT fumbles analytics]

Harvard Business Manager 35 (3): 70–79
Reprint of: Why IT fumbles analytics. Harvard Business Review 91 (1): 104–111.
Donald A. Marchand, Joe Peppard (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems
Volume 35
Issue 3
Pages 70–79

Journal Article

Por que a TI se atrapalha com a analítica? [Why IT fumbles analytics]

Harvard Business Review Brasil
Reprint of: Why IT fumbles analytics. Harvard Business Review 91 (1): 104–111.
Joe Peppard, Donald A. Marchand (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems

Na tentativa de extrair informação da imensidão de dados hoje colhidos de fontes internas e externas, muitas empresas estão investindo pesado em ferramentas de TI e contratando cientistas de dados. A maioria, contudo, pena para conseguir um retorno digno do esforço. Isso porque estão abordando projetos de “big data” e analítica da mesma forma que abordam qualquer outro projeto de TI, sem perceber que são dois bichos completamente distintos.


Journal Article

Patent examination at the State Intellectual Property Office in China

Research Policy 42 (2): 552–563
Johannes Liegsalz, Stefan Wagner (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment, Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): patent system, patent examination, State Intellectual Property Office China, duration analysis

The number of patent applications filed at the Chinese State Intellectual Property Office SIPO grew tremendously over the last decades and the SIPO has become the world's third largest patent office by 2009. In this paper, we provide an overview of the institutional background of patent examination in China. Moreover, we empirically analyze the determinants of the grant lags applicants have to expect at the SIPO. The multivariate duration analysis is based on the population of 443,533 patent applications filed at the SIPO between 1990 and 2002. The average grant lag is 4.71 years with considerable variation across 30 different technology areas. Interestingly, we find that Chinese applicants are able to achieve faster patent grants than their non-Chinese counterparts (even after controlling for various other determinants of grant lags). This might be an indication of a differential treatment of Chinese applicants which would be in violation of Art. 3 (National Treatment) and Art. 4 (Most-favored Nation Treatment) of TRIPS that has been signed by China in 2001.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 42
Issue 2
Pages 552–563

Journal Article

A theory of self-control and naïveté: The blights of willpower and blessings of temptation

Journal of Economic Psychology 34 (1): 8–19
Kristian Ove R. Myrseth, Conny Wollbrant (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Ethics and social responsibility, Human resources management/organizational behavior, Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods
Keyword(s): inter-temporal choice, pre-commitment, temptation, self-control
JEL Code(s): D01, D03, D69, D90

We model self-control conflict as a stochastic struggle of an agent against a visceral influence, which impels the agent to act sub-optimally. The agent holds costly pre-commitment technology to avoid the conflict altogether and may decide whether to procure pre-commitment or to confront the visceral influence. We examine naïve expectations for the strength of the visceral influence; underestimating the visceral influence may lead the agent to exaggerate the expected utility of resisting temptation, and so mistakenly forego pre-commitment. Our analysis reveals conditions under which higher willpower – and lower visceral influence – reduces welfare. We further demonstrate that lowering risk aversion could reduce welfare. The aforementioned results call into question certain policy measures aimed at helping people improve their own behavior.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 34
Issue 1
Pages 8–19

Journal Article

Ties that last: Tie formation and persistence in research collaborations over time

Administrative Science Quarterly 58 (1): 69–110
Linus Dahlander, Daniel A. McFarland (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): research collaborations, network ties, tie formation, tie persistence, long-term ties, task relationships

Using a longitudinal dataset of research collaborations over 15 years at Stanford University, we build a theory of intraorganizational task relationships that distinguishes the different factors associated with the formation and persistence of network ties. We highlight six factors: shared organizational foci, shared traits and interests, tie advantages from popularity, tie reinforcement from third parties, tie strength and multiplexity, and the instrumental returns from the products of ties. Findings suggest that ties form when unfamiliar people identify desirable and matching traits in potential partners. By contrast, ties persist when familiar people reflect on the quality of their relationship and shared experiences. The former calls for shallow, short-term strategies for assessing a broad array of potential ties; the latter calls for long-term strategies and substantive assessments of a relationship’s worth so as to draw extended rewards from the association. This suggests that organizational activities geared toward sustaining persistent intraorganizational task relationships need to be different from activities aimed at forging new ones.

With permission of Sage

Volume 58
Issue 1
Pages 69–110

Journal Article

Competencies, personality traits, and organizational rewards of middle managers: A motive-based approach

Human Performance 26 (1): 66–92
Laura Guillén, Willem E. Saris (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): competencies, personality traits, organizational rewards, motives, socioanalytic theory, middle managers
Volume 26
Issue 1
Pages 66–92

Journal Article

Differentiating market offerings using complexity and co-creation: Implications for customer decision-making uncertainty

European Business Review 25 (1): 65–85
Olaf Plötner, Jan Lakotta, Frank Jacob (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Strategy and general management
Keyword(s): decision-making uncertainty, industrial market offerings, complex solutions, typology

Customer decision-making uncertainty (DMU) is a persistent phenomenon in
business-to-business markets. However, there is substantial variation in the
degree customers perceive DMU and hence suppliers should react to it. Based
on existing industrial buying typologies, this paper proposes a new classification
scheme to explain variance in customer DMU. To this end, market offering
complexity and co-creation are used as defining dimensions and four ideal types
of industrial market offerings are constructed. We show theoretically that DMU is
especially prevalent for complex solutions. The paper closes with guidance for
suppliers of industrial market offerings and an outlook for future research.

With permission of Emerald

Volume 25
Issue 1
Pages 65–85

Journal Article

Diagnostic accuracy under congestion

Management Science 59 (1): 157–171
Saed Alizamir, Francis de Véricourt, Peng Sun (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods
Keyword(s): service operations, queueing theory, dynamic programming, decision making, information search, Bayes' rule

In diagnostic services, agents typically need to weigh the benefit of running an additional test and improving the accuracy of diagnosis against the cost of delaying the provision of services to others. Our paper analyzes how to dynamically manage this accuracy/congestion trade-off. To that end, we study an elementary congested system facing an arriving stream of customers. The diagnostic process consists of a search problem in which the service provider conducts a sequence of imperfect tests to determine the customer's type. We find that the agent should continue to perform the diagnosis as long as her current belief that the customer is of a given type falls into an interval that depends on the congestion level as well as the number of performed tests thus far. This search interval should shrink as congestion intensifies and as the number of performed tests increases if additional conditions hold. Our study reveals that, contrary to diagnostic services without congestion, the base rate (i.e., the prior probability of the customer type) has an effect on the agent's search strategy. In particular, the optimal search interval shrinks when customer types are more ambiguous a priori, i.e., as the base rate approaches the value at which the agent is indifferent between types. Finally, because of congestion effects, the agent should sometimes diagnose the customer as being of a given type, even if test results indicate otherwise. All these insights disappear in the absence of congestion.

© 2013 INFORMS

This publication was a finalist of the 2016 Service SIG Best Paper Competition.

Volume 59
Issue 1
Pages 157–171

Journal Article

Implications of the state aid modernisation for the assessment of large investment projects

European State Aid Law Quarterly 1: 46–60
Hans W. Friederiszick, Nicola Tosini (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s): competition policy, regional state aid, subsidies, anti-competitive effects
JEL Code(s): H81, L4, O25, R58
Issue 1
Pages 46–60

Journal Article

Sex, risk and the newsvendor

Journal of Operations Management 31 (1/2): 86–92
Francis de Véricourt, Kriti Jain, J. Neil Bearden, Allan Filipowicz (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods
Keyword(s): newsvendor, risk aversion, gender difference, behavioral operations

We present results from two experiments that reveal significant gender differences in ordering behavior in the newsvendor problem. In high margin settings, males tend to order more than females, and they also tend to achieve higher profits. There are no gender differences in low margin settings. We show that the observed gender differences are partially driven by (or mediated by) gender differences in risk appetite. Males tend to prefer taking greater risk than women, and this leads them to order more in the newsvendor problem (in high margin settings). We show that the risk-ordering relationship is related to financial risk attitudes but not to social risk attitudes, and also that the effect is not driven by gender differences in affect, a likely alternative explanation for the results.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 31
Issue 1/2
Pages 86–92

Journal Article

Why IT fumbles analytics

Harvard Business Review 91 (1): 104–111
Donald A. Marchand, Joe Peppard (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems
Keyword(s): Communications technology, information systems, organizations, systems engineering

Argues that, despite their large investments in data scientists, and IT tools, many companies are struggling to capitalize on the massive amounts of data now available to them. Suggests that most managers are employing the conventional approach to designing and installing IT systems and this approach may not be appropriate for exploiting the tremendous amounts of data now available from internal and external sources. Notes that a big data or analytics project is likely to be smaller and shorter than a conventional IT initiative, such as installing an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. Identifies five guidelines for taking an alternative approach to IT systems development: place people who will create meaning from the information at the heart of the initiative; unlock value from IT by asking second-order questions and giving teams the freedom to reframe business problems; equip teams with cognitive and behavioural scientists, who understand how people perceive problems and analyse data.; focus on learning by facilitating information sharing, examining assumptions, and striving to understand cause and effect; and worry more about solving business problems than about deploying technology.

Volume 91
Issue 1
Pages 104–111

Journal Article

Un/ethical company and brand perceptions: Conceptualising and operationalising consumer meanings

Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4): 551–565
Abstract:
Subject(s): Ethics and social responsibility, Marketing
Keyword(s): corporate ethics, consumer meanings, corporate social responsibility (CSR), consumer perceived ethicality (CPE), brand perceptions, construct conceptualization, scale development
Volume 111
Issue 4
Pages 551–565

Journal Article

Teaching sustainability to tomorrow's leaders

EFMD Global Focus 6 (3): 50–53
Abstract:
Subject(s): Ethics and social responsibility
Volume 6
Issue 3
Pages 50–53

Journal Article

Corporate Governance von Banken

Zeitschrift für Bankrecht und Bankwirtschaft (ZBB) 5: 388–392
Jörg Rocholl (2012)
Abstract:

Journal Article

Business models and patent strategies in multi-invention contexts

Ivey Business Journal 76 (5): 9–11
Deepak Somaya, David Teece, Simon Wakeman (2012)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): Innovation, commercialization, patents, multi-invention context
Volume 76
Issue 5
Pages 9–11

Pages