This is a picture of ESMT books and working papers

Publications

ESMT Berlin publishes in international academic journals, which are first-class in their respective fields. Research also provides cutting-edge and profound insights for the business community as well as the classroom through managerial publications and case studies. This rare integration of research and practice makes ESMT Berlin an outstanding location for generating relevant and ground-breaking knowledge.

Journal Article

Footprints in the sands of time: A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of customer satisfaction and customer–company identification over time

Journal of Marketing 78 (6): 78–102
Till Haumann, Benjamin Quaiser, Jan Wieseke, Mario Rese (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Marketing
Keyword(s): Customer satisfaction, customer–company identification, competitive advertising, customer loyalty, customer willingness to pay, latent growth modeling

Previous research has identified customer satisfaction and customer–company identification as two of the most important concepts in relationship marketing. Despite their proclaimed importance, research on their long-term effectiveness is surprisingly scarce. Furthermore, comparative research acknowledging the concepts' different theoretical roots and illuminating the differences in their long-term effectiveness is lacking. Also, little is known about how competitive actions affect the long-term effectiveness of both concepts. This study makes a first attempt to address these research voids and offers a comparative analysis of the effectiveness of customer satisfaction and customer–company identification in driving important customer outcomes over time. Latent growth analyses of rich longitudinal data from customers over nine measurement points spanning 43 weeks (n = 6930) show that customer satisfaction and customer–company identification have positive initial effects on customers' loyalty and willingness to pay, but differ in their ability to maintain these positive effects over time. While the positive effects of customer satisfaction decrease more rapidly, the effects of customer– company identification are significantly more persistent. Analysis of the moderating effects of relative competitive advertising suggests that customer–company identification is more effective at immunizing customers against competitive actions.

With the permission of the American Marketing Association

Volume 78
Issue 6
Pages 78–102

Journal Article

Willing to pay more, eager to pay less: The role of customer loyalty in price negotiations

Journal of Marketing 78 (6): 17–37
Jan Wieseke, Sascha H. Alavi, Johannes Habel (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Marketing
Keyword(s): Customer loyalty, negotiation, personal selling
JEL Code(s): M310

This paper is the first to empirically examine the effect of customer loyalty in retail price negotiations. Across three field studies and one negotiation experiment, the authors establish what they call the loyalty-discount cycle: in price negotiations with salespeople, loyal customers realize deeper discounts that in turn increase customer loyalty, resulting in a downward spiral of a company’s price enforcement. The reason for the positive effect of customer loyalty on discount is twofold: (1) loyal customers demand a reward for their loyalty and invoke their elevated perceived negotiation power; (2) to retain loyal customers, salespeople grant discounts more willingly. Furthermore, the mechanisms are moderated by the basis of a customer’s loyalty (price vs. quality) and the length of the relationship between the salesperson and the customer. To escape the loyalty-discount cycle, salespeople can use functional and relational customer-oriented behaviors. The study helps managers and salespeople to optimize their price enforcement and servicing of loyal customers.

With the permission of the American Marketing Association

Volume 78
Issue 6
Pages 17–37

Journal Article

Overcoming localization of knowledge: The role of professional service firms

Strategic Management Journal 35 (11): 1671–1688
2015 VHB Best Paper Award (Nominated)
Stefan Wagner, Karin Hoisl, Grid Thoma (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems, Technology, R&D management

The literature on organizational learning asserts that external learning is often limited geographically and technologically. We scrutinize to what extent organizations acquire external knowledge by accessing external knowledge repositories. We argue that professional service firms (PSFs) grant access to non-localized knowledge repositories and thereby not only facilitate external learning but also help to overcome localization. Focusing on patent law firms, we test our predictions using a unique dataset of 544,820 pairs of EP patent applications. Analyzing patterns of knowledge flows captured in patent citations we find that accessing a PSF’s repository facilitates the acquisition of external knowledge. As the effect is more pronounced for knowledge that is distant to a focal organization we conclude that having access to a knowledge repository compensates for localization disadvantages.

© 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Volume 35
Issue 11
Pages 1671–1688

Journal Article

International standards and international trade: Empirical evidence from ISO 9000 diffusion

International Journal of Industrial Organization 36 (5): 70–82
Joseph A. Clougherty, Michał Grajek (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s): Networks, international trade, standards, technical trade barriers, ISO 9000
JEL Code(s): C51, F13, L15

Empirical scholarship on the standards-trade relationship has been held up due to methodological challenges: measurement, varied effects, and endogeneity. Considering the trade-effects of one particular standard (ISO 9000), we surmount methodological challenges by measuring standardization via national penetration of ISO 9000, allowing standardization to manifest via multiple (quality-signaling, information/compliance-cost, and common-language) channels, and using instrumental variable, multilateral resistance and panel data techniques to overcome endogeneity. We find evidence of common-language and quality-signaling augmenting country-pair trade. Yet, ISO-rich nations (most notably European) benefit the most from standardization, while ISO-poor nations find ISO 9000 to represent a trade barrier due to compliance-cost effects.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 36
Issue 5
Pages 70–82

Journal Article

Fehler im System [Error in the system]

Harvard Business Manager 10: 82–86
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior, Strategy and general management
Keyword(s): Error management
Issue 10
Pages 82–86

Journal Article

How newly appointed CIOs take charge

MIS Quarterly Executive 13 (3): 159–173
Anthony B. Gerth, Joe Peppard (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems, Strategy and general management
Keyword(s): Taking charge, Chief Information Officer, new appointment, transition, leader socialization, executive integration, IT leadership
Volume 13
Issue 3
Pages 159–173

Journal Article

The semiformal organization

Organization Science 25 (5): 1306–1324
Susan Biancani, Daniel A. McFarland, Linus Dahlander (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Entrepreneurship, Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): social networks; organizational form; organizational structure; innovation; network analysis; sociology of science

This paper draws attention to a new dimension of organization, the semiformal organization, and it reveals how the allocation of different membership forms can render knowledge-intensive organizations more flexible and exploratory in their knowledge creation efforts without sacrificing the functions stably enacted via the formal organization. Most knowledge-intensive organizations seek to create new spaces for collaborations through formally prescribed departments and divisions or through serendipitous, emergent, informal associations (i.e., the formal and informal organization). However, organizations also strategically manage what we call the “semiformal organization” to guide the creation of new work relations and encourage innovation. These secondary memberships are organizationally sponsored and directly related to the organizations’ core research functions, but they are voluntarily joined. As such, they are distinct from formal and informal memberships. On the basis of extensive longitudinal analyses of research initiatives at Stanford University, we find that the semiformal organization provides a compelling channel through which organizations can shape employees’ collaborations and overall productivity.

© 2014 INFORMS

Volume 25
Issue 5
Pages 1306–1324

Journal Article

Zooming in while zooming out: How a consumption context animates a macrofocus investigation and stimulates new opportunities for theoretical insights

Advances in Consumer Research 42: 255–259
Katja H. Brunk, Benjamin J. Hartmann (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Marketing
Keyword(s): Theory development, unit of analysis, consumer acculturation, nostalgia, consumption culture
JEL Code(s): M31
Volume 42
Pages 255–259

Journal Article

Staatsverschuldung: Privilegien des Staates auf dem Prüfstand [Sovereign debt: Analyzing state's privileges]

Wirtschaftsdienst 94 (8): 560–563
Thiess Büttner, Kai Konrad, Jörg Rocholl (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s): Economic policy, labor economics, macroeconomics/monetary economics, social policy, European integration
JEL Code(s): E58, G38, H63
Volume 94
Issue 8
Pages 560–563

Journal Article

Engendered access or engendered care? Evidence from a major Indian hospital

Economic and Political Weekly 49 (25): 47–53
Rajshri Jayaraman, Debraj Ray, Shing-Yi Wang (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment, Health and environment
Volume 49
Issue 25
Pages 47–53

Journal Article

Error management: Not just a wing and a prayer

EFMD Global Focus 8 (2): 52–55
Jan U. Hagen (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Error management, leadership
Volume 8
Issue 2
Pages 52–55

Journal Article

Market definition in two-sided markets: Theory and practice

Journal of Competition Law and Economics 10 (2): 293–339
Lapo Filistrucchi, Damien Geradin, Eric van Damme, Pauline Affeldt (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment
JEL Code(s): L40, L50, K21
Volume 10
Issue 2
Pages 293–339

Journal Article

Ein Stresstest für das europäische Bankensystem [A stress test for the European banking system]

Die Bank 6: 14–17
Viral V. Acharya, Sascha Steffen (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Finance, accounting and corporate governance
Issue 6
Pages 14–17

Journal Article

Focusing on teams in crisis management education: An integration and simulation-based approach

Academy of Management Learning and Education 13 (2): 208–221
Mary Waller, Zhike Lei, Robert Pratten (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): error management, teams

Crisis management teams occupy central roles in many normative models of crisis management; however, management education generally address neither the nature of such teams nor the capabilities necessary for these teams to be effective. To help address this situation, in this paper we integrate information from phase-based crisis management models with team dynamics theories, and suggest which team capabilities play key roles for crisis management teams as they face emergent crises. Using this integration, we then explore simulation-based training as a means to teach and assess crisis management team capabilities. We describe the design, development and implementation of a simulation for crisis teams, and discuss future applications of simulation-based training for crisis management education.

With permission of the Academy of Management

Volume 13
Issue 2
Pages 208–221

Journal Article

Open to suggestions: How organizations elicit suggestions through proactive and reactive attention

Research Policy 43 (5): 812–827
Linus Dahlander, Henning Piezunka (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): Open innovation, attention, suggestions, ideation, openness, user innovation, success bias, social media

This paper analyzes organizations’ attempts to entice external contributors to submit suggestions for future organizational action. While earlier work has elaborated on the advantages of leveraging the knowledge of external contributors, our findings show that organizational attempts to attract such involvement are more likely to wither or die. We develop arguments about what increases the likelihood of getting suggestions from externals in the future, namely through (1) proactive attention (submitting internally developed suggestions to externals to stimulate debate); and (2) reactive attention (paying attention to suggestions from externals to signal they are being listened to), particularly when those suggestions are submitted by newcomers. Findings from an analysis of about 24,000 initiatives by organizations to involve external contributors suggest these actions are crucial for receiving suggestions from external contributors. Our results are contingent upon the stage of the initiative because organizations’ actions exert more influence in initiatives that lack a history of prior suggestions. Our work has implications for scholars of open innovation because it highlights the importance of considering failures as well successes: focusing exclusively on initiatives that reach a certain stage can lead to partial or erroneous conclusions about why some organizations engage external contributors while others fail.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 43
Issue 5
Pages 812–827

Pages