This is a picture of ESMT books and working papers

Publications

ESMT Berlin publishes in international academic journals, which are first-class in their respective fields. Research also provides cutting-edge and profound insights for the business community as well as the classroom through managerial publications and case studies. This rare integration of research and practice makes ESMT Berlin an outstanding location for generating relevant and ground-breaking knowledge.

Journal Article

Multiple rounds in a chain store game

Theory and Decision 81 (4): 571–579
Michael Melles, Rainer Nitsche (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s): Multimarket firms, entry, predation, reputation
Volume 81
Issue 4
Pages 571–579

Journal Article

A tool for balancing your company's digital investments

Harvard Business Review October
Joe Peppard (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems, Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): Key operational investments
JEL Code(s): D80

How does your organization manage the money it spends on digital? One surprising finding of my research is that most do not distinguish between different types of digital investments, treating all in a similar way. This situation exists because, believe it or not, a lot of organizations lack any mechanisms to help them actively manage the evaluation, selection, monitoring, and adjustment of digital investments to achieve clearly defined business results while meeting clear risk and return expectations.

Issue October
ISSN 0017-8012 (Print)

Journal Article

Data from a pre-publication independent replication initiative examining ten moral judgement effects

Scientific Data 3
Warren Tierney, Martin Schweinsberg, Jennifer Jordan, Deanna M. Kennedy, Israr Qureshi, S. Amy Sommer, Nico Thornley et al. (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Decision making, ethics, psychology, research management

We present the data from a crowdsourced project seeking to replicate findings in independent laboratories before (rather than after) they are published. In this Pre-Publication Independent Replication (PPIR) initiative, 25 research groups attempted to replicate 10 moral judgment effects from a single laboratory’s research pipeline of unpublished findings. The 10 effects were investigated using online/lab surveys containing psychological manipulations (vignettes) followed by questionnaires. Results revealed a mix of reliable, unreliable, and culturally moderated findings. Unlike any previous replication project, this dataset includes the data from not only the replications but also from the original studies, creating a unique corpus that researchers can use to better understand reproducibility and irreproducibility in science.

Volume 3
ISSN 2052-4463 (Online)

Journal Article

Germany's RWE and E.ON splitting: Will they prosper?

EEnergy Informer 26 (10): 10–12
Abstract:
Subject(s): Product and operations management, Strategy and general management, Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): decentralized energy, RWE, E.ON, Germany, power generators
JEL Code(s): Q40, Q48
Volume 26
Issue 10
Pages 10–12

Journal Article

Die EU-Richtlinie über Netz- und Informationssicherheit: Anforderungen an digitale Dienste [The EU directive on network and information security: Requirements for digital services]

Computer und Recht 2016 (10): 663–670
Abstract:
Subject(s): Technology, R&D management
Volume 2016
Issue 10
Pages 663–670
ISSN 2194-4172 (Online)

Journal Article

On the existence of efficient and fair extensions of communication values for connected graphs

Economics Letters 146 (9): 103–106
Sylvain Béal, André Casajus, Frank Huettner (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods
Keyword(s): Shapley value, potential, random partition, concentration of power, communication graph, fairness, efficiency, efficient extension, fair extension, Myerson value
JEL Code(s): C71, D60

We study values for TU games with a communication graph (CO-values). In particular, we show that CO-values for connected graphs that are fair and efficient allow for a unique efficient and fair extension to the full domain.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 146
Issue 9
Pages 103–106

Journal Article

The pipeline project: Pre-publication independent replications of a single laboratory's research pipeline

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 66 (5): 55–67
Martin Schweinsberg, Nikhil Madan, Michelangelo Vianello, Amy S. Sommer, Jennifer Jordan, Warren Tierney, Eli Awtrey et al. (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Crowdsourcing science, replication, reproducibility, research transparency, methodology, meta-science

This crowdsourced project introduces a collaborative approach to improving the reproducibility of scientific research, in which findings are replicated in qualified independent laboratories before (rather than after) they are published. Our goal is to establish a non-adversarial replication process with highly informative final results. To illustrate the Pre-Publication Independent Replication (PPIR) approach, 25 research groups conducted replications of all ten moral judgment effects which the last author and his collaborators had “in the pipeline” as of August 2014. Six findings replicated according to all replication criteria, one finding replicated but with a significantly smaller effect size than the original, one finding replicated consistently in the original culture but not outside of it, and two findings failed to find support. In total, 40% of the original findings failed at least one major replication criterion. Potential ways to implement and incentivize pre-publication independent replication on a large scale are discussed.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 66
Issue 5
Pages 55–67

Journal Article

Engaging employees to create a sustainable business

Stanford Social Innovation Review 14 (4): 34–39
Paul Polman, CB Bhattacharya (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Ethics and social responsibility, Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Corporate social responsibility, corporations, environmental sustainability, human capital, shared value, socially responsible business
Volume 14
Issue 4
Pages 34–39

Journal Article

Team adaptiveness in dynamic contexts: Contextualizing the roles of interaction patterns and in-process planning

Group and Organization Management 41 (4): 491–525
2016 Sage Best Paper Award
Zhike Lei, Mary J. Waller, Jan U. Hagen, Seth Kaplan (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Team adaptiveness, patterned team interactions, in-process planning, dynamic situations, simulation

Previous research asserts that teams working in routine situations pass through performance episodes characterized by action and transition phases, while other evidence suggests that certain team behaviors significantly influence team effectiveness during nonroutine situations. We integrate these two areas of research—one focusing on the temporal nature of team episodic performance and the other on interaction patterns and planning in teams—to more fully understand how teams working in dynamic settings successfully transition across routine and nonroutine situations. Using behavioral data collected from airline flight crews working in a flight simulator, we find that different interaction pattern characteristics are related to team performance in routine and nonroutine situations, and that teams engage in more contingency, in-process planning behavior during routine versus nonroutine situations. Moreover, we find that the relationship between this in-process planning and subsequent team adaptiveness is curvilinear (inverted U-shaped). That is, team contingency or in-process planning activity may initially increase team adaptiveness, but too much planning has adverse effects on subsequent performance.

With permission of SAGE Publishing

Volume 41
Issue 4
Pages 491–525

Journal Article

The Dirty Dozen: How unethical behaviour creeps into your organisation

The European Business Review July/August: 37–41
Abstract:
Subject(s): Ethics and social responsibility
Issue July/August
Pages 37–41

Journal Article

Impact assessment: Corporate sustainability 2.0

Stanford Social Innovation Review
Joanna Radeke (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Ethics and social responsibility
Keyword(s): Corporate social responsibility, corporations, environmental sustainability, human resources, organizational learning, performance metrics, socially responsible business, transparency
JEL Code(s): M000

Also available in Portuguese: Mensurando impacto: Sustentabilidade empresarial 2.0.


Journal Article

Team diversity and categorization salience: Capturing diversity-blind, intergroup biased, and multicultural perceptions

Organizational Research Methods 19 (3): 433–474
Margarita Mayo, Daan van Knippenberg, Laura Guillén, Shainaz Firfiray (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Multivariate analysis, computational modeling, team diversity, categorization salience, leadership

It is increasingly recognized that team diversity with respect to various social categories (e.g., gender, race) does not automatically result in the cognitive activation of these categories (i.e., categorization salience), and that factors influencing this relationship are important for the effects of diversity. Thus, it is a methodological problem that no measurement technique is available to measure categorization salience in a way that efficiently applies to multiple dimensions of diversity in multiple combinations. Based on insights from artificial intelligence research, we propose a technique to capture the salience of different social categorizations in teams that does not prime the salience of these categories. We illustrate the importance of such measurement by showing how it may be used to distinguish among diversity-blind responses (low categorization salience), multicultural responses (positive responses to categorization salience), and intergroup biased responses (negative responses to categorization salience) in a study of gender and race diversity and the gender by race faultline in 38 manufacturing teams comprising 239 members.

With permission of SAGE Publishing

Volume 19
Issue 3
Pages 433–474

Journal Article

A tool to map your next digital initiative

Harvard Business Review
Joe Peppard (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Information technology and systems, Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): Change management, IT, benefits dependency network (BDN), digitalization
JEL Code(s): O32, O33

Given all the attention that “digital” is getting at the moment, you would be forgiven for thinking that it is somehow new. In fact, the relentless drive to embrace digital technologies has been ongoing for many decades.

What also seems to have been forgotten are the lessons from these earlier attempts to leverage IT (remember that IT is a digital technology). Unfortunately, the history of IT investments in most organizations is far from stellar: Research over the years suggests that the overall failure rate of IT projects is around 70%. We know that when IT projects fail, it is usually not because the technology didn’t work (although this can sometimes be the case), but because the changes required at an organizational and employee level weren’t managed effectively. Quite simply, adding technology does not automatically confer expected benefits; these benefits have to be unlocked and this can only happen through achieving organizational changes.

ISSN 0017-8012 (Print)

Journal Article

Managing customer satisfaction better

The European Business Review May/June: 52–54
Abstract:
Subject(s): Marketing
Keyword(s): Market research, customer satisfaction, statistics
JEL Code(s): M310
Issue May/June
Pages 52–54

Journal Article

Where do you begin with your (big) data initiative?

The European Business Review May/June: 19–25
Joe Peppard (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s): Big data, knowledge creation, insight, information, IT, competitive advantage
Issue May/June
Pages 19–25

Pages