This is a photo of Prof. Konstantin Korotov teaching.

Konstantin Korotov

Working Paper

Manfred F. R. Kets de Vries: Playing the Morosophe

INSEAD Working Paper No. 2016/73/EFE
Elizabeth Florent-Treacy, Konstantin Korotov, Caroline Rook (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Biography, psychodynamic approach, management science, clinical paradigm, universal motivational drivers, leadership development, group coaching, legacy

This chapter addresses the question of what makes Manfred Kets de Vries “tick?” What “red threads” run through his life? And how has his way of thinking contributed to the world? To explore these questions, the authors use one of his Kets de Vries’ methodologies and put him, metaphorically, on the psychoanalyst’s couch. It will be featured in the forthcoming book Enduring Thoughts of the Thinkers of Organizational Change by Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.

The full text of the working paper is available at SSRN.

Pages 35
Publication Nr. 2016/73/EFE

ESMT Working Paper

Career entrepreneurship

ESMT Working Paper No. 08-009 (R1)
Konstantin Korotov, Svetlana Khapova, Michael B. Arthur (2010)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Career entrepreneurship, career success, career investments, three ways of knowing

This article introduces "career entrepreneurship," a rapidly spreading phenomenon in the global knowledge-driven economy. Career entrepreneurship involves taking an entrepreneurial approach to managing our careers. It means doing things that seem "illegitimate" to other people and contradict socially-recognized and accepted sequences of work experiences in terms of age, education, or socio-economic progression. This kind of behavior challenges established norms about typical career development. The evidence presented in this article suggests new possibilities for thinking about the way individuals invest in their careers, new insights for organizations interested in capturing the potential of career entrepreneurship, and new ideas for career and life coaches to support people embracing the phenomenon. The article offers a primer on career entrepreneurship to all three groups of readers, calling for more effective collaborative relationships and more effective leveraging of individuals' career investments.

Pages 32
Publication Nr. 08-009 (R1)
ISSN 1866–3494 (Print)

Working Paper

Organizational culture, leadership, change, and stress

INSEAD Working Paper No. 2009/10/EFE/IGLC
Published in International handbook of work and health psychology, 3rd ed., ed. Cary L. Cooper, James Campbell Quick, Marc J. Schabracq, 411–426. London: Wiley.
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): leadership, organization change, stress, oganizational culture

How do organizations become and remain great places to work? That is the question that primarily motivates this chapter. The authors claim that is precisely the adaptive capability of self-renewal which characterizes great places to work. But changing mindsets is never easy and the need for adaptation usually induces a high degree of stress, both at individual and organizational levels. Even if a simple recipe for facing continuous adaptation does not exist, learning how to manage organizational change processes effectively may serve as a platform to motivate people to create better organizations and to keep individual and organizational stress at acceptable levels. This chapter discusses the internal and external pressures that may trigger organizational changes. Then, it explores the four stages of the organizational change process - creating a shared mindset, changing behaviour, institutionalizing change, and transforming the organization. Implications and challenges for practitioners are drawn.

A pdf file of this working paper may be available at INSEAD.

Pages 25
Publication Nr. 2009/10/EFE/IGLC

ESMT Working Paper

Upsetting events and career investments in the Russian context

ESMT Working Paper No. 08-001
Konstantin Korotov, Svetlana Khapova (2008)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): careers, intelligent career investments, career divestment, upsetting events, Russia

In this paper we examine the role of disruptive or upsetting events in people's professional lives and explore how they influence individuals' investments in their careers. Based on previous research we have assumed that due to considerable societal and economic changes in Russia and the reported negative consequences felt by many individuals, the context of that country is a fruitful arena for an investigation of the role of upsetting events on individuals' careers. At the same time, despite the negative events and a disruption of many traditional career-supporting structures, a significant number of Russians managed to reinvent their careers and achieve tremendous objective and subjective success in their careers in a relatively short time period.

This paper examines stories about career investments of 140 successful entrepreneurs from Russia. A significant portion of these people explicitly reported influence of upsetting events on their own career investments. Based on the exploration of career stories, the paper introduced a typology of the upsetting events in the Russian context. The events were generally classified into those that represented "macro" and "micro" upsetting events. Macro events refer to changes in socio-economic, and political systems. Micro events refer to the events that only concern the individual him- or herself, or may include events at work or at home. Our analysis of the career investments of the Russian entrepreneurs using the intelligent career concept shows that when faced with the upsetting events individuals tend to (a) reconsider their existing events, (b) divest from their old ways of knowing, and (c) invest in relatively new ways of knowing.

Our study calls a particular attention to the role of career divestments, or discontinuing certain ways of investing in order free resources for a different investment expected to be more fruitful in terms or returns. Attention to divestment may be warranted due to the increased unpredictability of working lives of today's career actors.

This study contributes to responding to a call for a better understanding of the role of upsetting events on people's careers and the society at large. We also bring further our understanding of human adjustment to the sometimes upsetting changes in their surroundings through working life, thus enhancing our understanding of the role of careers in socio-economic systems. Last but not least, the study also contributes to a better understanding of careers in modern Russia. With the increasing role of Russia on the international political and economic arena, understanding people through looking at their working lives is a good start for multiple potential research endeavors in the fields of career research and beyond.

Pages 36
Publication Nr. 08-001
ISSN 1866–3494 (Print)

Working Paper

Understanding visionary leadership perceptions: A leader identity perspective

Laura Guillén, Margarita Mayo, Daniel S. Whitman, Konstantin Korotov
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Visionary leadership perceptions, affective-identity motivation to lead, regulatory focus, self-interested motives to lead, identity

Although the consequences of visionary-related aspects of leadership for followers are well researched, much less is known about the underpinnings that explain how and why some leaders are perceived as visionary while others are not. Drawing from the leadership identity and self-regulation literatures, we propose that leaders’ regulatory foci influence the extent to which others perceive them as visionary via affective-identity motivation to lead. We delineate boundary conditions to our model and propose that when leaders have self-interested motives to lead, the visionary glow generated by their affective-identity motivation to lead is likely to wane. In a multi-source field study of 153 focal managers with people responsibilities and 1,451 raters (e.g., supervisors, peers, followers, and internal clients), we show that managers with high-promotion, low-prevention regulatory foci had a stronger affective-identity motivation to lead, and, in turn, were perceived by others as visionary leaders. Furthermore, the association between affective-identity motivation to lead and visionary leadership perceptions was only realized when the manager had low self-interested motives to lead. We discuss the theoretical and practical implication of these findings.