This is a photo of Prof. Laura Guillén, ESMT, teaching.

Laura Guillén

Journal Article
Forthcoming

When age does not harm innovation and job outcomes: Testing organizational collaboration as a social buffer

Human Resource Management
Laura Guillén, Florian Kunze
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Age, innovative behavior, inter-departmental collaboration, personnel outcomes

Journal Article

Appearing self-confident and getting credit for it: Why it may be easier for men than women to gain influence at work

Human Resource Management 57 (4): 839–854
Special Issue: Women's Career Equality and Leadership in Organizations: Creating an Evidence‐based Positive Change July/August 2018
Laura Guillén, Margarita Mayo, Natalia Karelaia (2018)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Self-confidence appearance, gender, job performance, prosocial orientation, organizational influence

Appearing self-confident is instrumental for progressing at work. However, little is known about what makes individuals appear self-confident at work. We draw on attribution and social perceptions literatures to theorize about both antecedents and consequences of appearing self-confident for men and women in male-dominated professions. We suggest that performance is one determinant of whether individuals are seen as confident at work, and that this effect is moderated by gender. We further propose that self-confidence appearance increases the extent to which individuals exert influence in their organizations. However, for women, appearing self-confident is not enough to gain influence. In contrast to men, women in addition are “required” to be prosocially oriented. Multisource, time-lag data from a technological company showed that performance had a positive effect on self-confidence appearance for both men and women. However, the effect of self-confidence appearance on organizational influence was moderated by gender and prosocial orientation, as predicted. Our results show that through self-confidence appearance, job performance directly enables men to exert influence in their organizations. In contrast, high performing women gain influence only when self-confidence appearance is coupled with prosocial orientation. We discuss the implications of our results for gender equality, leadership, and social perceptions.

© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Volume 57
Issue 4
Pages 839–854

Journal Article

Is the confidence gap between men and women a myth?

Harvard Business Review
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Confidence appearance, gender, influence, job performance
ISSN 0017-8012 (Print)

Journal Article

Team diversity and categorization salience: Capturing diversity-blind, intergroup biased, and multicultural perceptions

Organizational Research Methods 19 (3): 433–474
Margarita Mayo, Daan van Knippenberg, Laura Guillén, Shainaz Firfiray (2016)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Multivariate analysis, computational modeling, team diversity, categorization salience, leadership

It is increasingly recognized that team diversity with respect to various social categories (e.g., gender, race) does not automatically result in the cognitive activation of these categories (i.e., categorization salience), and that factors influencing this relationship are important for the effects of diversity. Thus, it is a methodological problem that no measurement technique is available to measure categorization salience in a way that efficiently applies to multiple dimensions of diversity in multiple combinations. Based on insights from artificial intelligence research, we propose a technique to capture the salience of different social categorizations in teams that does not prime the salience of these categories. We illustrate the importance of such measurement by showing how it may be used to distinguish among diversity-blind responses (low categorization salience), multicultural responses (positive responses to categorization salience), and intergroup biased responses (negative responses to categorization salience) in a study of gender and race diversity and the gender by race faultline in 38 manufacturing teams comprising 239 members.

With permission of SAGE Publishing

Volume 19
Issue 3
Pages 433–474

Journal Article

Is leadership a part of me? A leader identity approach to understanding the motivation to lead

Leadership Quarterly 26 (5): 802–820
Laura Guillén, Margarita Mayo, Konstantin Korotov (2015)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): Motivation to lead, self-to-leader comparisons, self-efficacy perceptions, leader identity

Drawing on social comparison and identity literature, we suggest that individuals' comparisons of themselves to their own standards of leadership relate to their leadership motivation. We propose and test a model of motivation to lead (MTL) based on two types of self-to-leader comparisons: self-to-exemplar and self-to-prototype comparisons with respect to affiliation. In our main study, using data from a sample of 180 executives, we apply structural equation models to test our predictions. We find that self-comparisons with concrete, influential leaders of the past or present (self-to-exemplar comparisons) relate positively to MTL. We also find that self-comparisons with more general representations of leaders (self-to-prototype comparisons in affiliation) relate to MTL. Whereas the effect of self-to-exemplar comparisons is mediated through individuals' leadership self-efficacy perceptions, the effect of self-to-prototype comparisons is not. We replicate these findings in three follow-up studies using different research designs. We derive implications for theory and practice.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 26
Issue 5
Pages 802–820

Journal Article

Me, a woman and a leader: Positive social identity and identity conflict

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 125 (2): 204–219
Natalia Karelaia, Laura Guillén (2014)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior

This paper focuses on women leaders’ self-views as women and leaders and explores consequences of positive social identity (i.e., positive evaluation of the social category in question) for women in leadership positions. We hypothesized that holding positive gender and leader identities reduced perceived conflict between women’s gender and leader identities and thereby resulted in favorable psychological and motivational consequences. Studies 1 and 2 revealed that positive gender identity indeed reduced women leaders’ identity conflict. In Study 3, we found that by lessening identity conflict, positive gender identity reduced stress, increased life satisfaction, and caused women to construe leading more as an attractive goal than a duty. In contrast, positive leader identity directly affected women’s motivation to lead, but did not reduce their identity conflict. Overall, these results emphasize the protective role of women’s positive gender identity for their advancement in organizations and leader identity development.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 125
Issue 2
Pages 204–219

Journal Article

Competencies, personality traits, and organizational rewards of middle managers: A motive-based approach

Human Performance 26 (1): 66–92
Laura Guillén, Willem E. Saris (2013)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): competencies, personality traits, organizational rewards, motives, socioanalytic theory, middle managers
Volume 26
Issue 1
Pages 66–92

Journal Article

Measurement of social participation and its place in social capital theory

Social Indicators Research 100 (2): 331–350
Laura Guillén, Lluis Coromina, Willem E. Saris (2010)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods
Keyword(s): social participation, European Social Survey, social capital, informal participation, formal participation, trust
Volume 100
Issue 2
Pages 331–350

Journal Article

The impact of social and emotional competencies of effectiveness of Spanish executives

Journal of Management Development 28 (9): 771–793
Laura Guillén Ramo, Willem E. Saris, Richard Boyatzis (2009)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): emotional intelligence, competencies, personality traits, job performance

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this study: emotional and social competencies are positively and significantly related with job performance; and emotional and social competencies will be more successful in predicting performance than universal personality dimensions, like the Big Five personality traits.

With permission of Emerald

Volume 28
Issue 9
Pages 771–793

Journal Article

Effect of response scale on assessment of emotional intelligence competencies

Personality and Individual Differences 46 (5/6): 575–580
Joan Manuel Batista-Foguet, Willem E. Saris, Richard Boyatzis, Laura Guillén, Richard Serlavós (2009)
Abstract:
Subject(s): Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s): response bias, cross-cultural metric equivalence, multi-source feedback assessment, competency assessment, emotional intelligence

Personality and behavioural assessment are common practice in research and applications throughout the world. Most of this research has been in English-speaking countries. Relatively little work has been done in cross-cultural settings to study the nature of response scale. Familiarity with an 11-point response scale in European countries may affect the reliability of questionnaire responses. In Spain, with mainly European MBA students, results show that an 11-point scale provides composites with greater reliability, validity and less invalidity, than the commonly used 5-point scale.

With permission of Elsevier

Volume 46
Issue 5/6
Pages 575–580